Supreme Court rules fired Harrison County deputy deserves anothe - WBOY - Clarksburg, Morgantown: News, Sports, Weather

Supreme Court rules fired Harrison County deputy deserves another hearing

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A fired Harrison County sheriff's deputy will receive another hearing in an attempt to regain his job, according to a West Virginia Supreme Court ruling.

Former Lieutenant Greg Scolapio, who is now Lumberport's chief of police, is owed an evidentiary hearing before the county's Civil Service Commission, according to a 4-1 opinion issued by the court Thursday.

A pre-disciplinary hearing was held on February 18, 2015, in which the board said it found reasonable grounds to terminate Scolapio. This came after former Sheriff Albert Marano suspended him following an incident at the Harrison County Courthouse involving an unattended lunch cooler. 

In March 2015, Scolapio filed an appeal to the commission to request an evidentiary hearing. In April 2015, the commission denied that request, stating that it would decide the matter based upon the record from the pre-disciplinary hearing. As a result, Scolapio appealed the matter to circuit court in May 2015.  On August 9, 2016, the court decided that Scolapio was entitled to a hearing before the commission.

After the August 2016 circuit court ruling, the sheriff's department appealed the ruling to the Supreme Court, which led to Thursday's decision. 

Now, Scolapio's case will head back to Harrison County for an evidentiary hearing before the Civil Service Commission, which could allow him to regain his position as a sheriff's lieutenant. However, the outcome of that hearing, which has yet to be scheduled, could be appealed to circuit court and, eventually, the West Virginia Supreme Court.A fired Harrison County sheriff's deputy will receive another hearing in an attempt to regain his job, according to a West Virginia Supreme Court ruling.

Former Lieutenant Greg Scolapio, who is now Lumberport's chief of police, is owed an evidentiary hearing before the county's Civil Service Commission, according to a 4-1 opinion issued by the court Thursday.

A pre-disciplinary hearing was held on February 18, 2015, in which the board said it found reasonable grounds to terminate Scolapio. This came after former Sheriff Albert Marano suspended him following an incident at the Harrison County Courthouse involving an unattended lunch cooler. 

In March 2015, Scolapio filed an appeal to the commission to request an evidentiary hearing. In April 2015, the commission denied that request, stating that it would decide the matter based upon the record from the pre-disciplinary hearing. As a result, Scolapio appealed the matter to circuit court in May 2015. On August 9, 2016, the court decided that Scolapio was entitled to a hearing before the commission.

After the August 2016 circuit court ruling, the sheriff's department appealed the ruling to the Supreme Court, which led to Thursday's decision. 

Now, Scolapio's case will head back to Harrison County for an evidentiary hearing before the Civil Service Commission, which could allow him to regain his position as a sheriff's lieutenant. However, the outcome of that hearing, which has yet to be scheduled, could be appealed to circuit court and, eventually, the West Virginia Supreme Court.

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