Fairmont Man Convicted of 143 Counts of Child Sex Crimes - WBOY - Clarksburg, Morgantown: News, Sports, Weather

Fairmont Man Convicted of 143 Counts of Child Sex Crimes

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Iran Glover is escorted out of the Marion County Courthouse following his conviction Iran Glover is escorted out of the Marion County Courthouse following his conviction
FAIRMONT -

A Fairmont man has been convicted of sexually assaulting and sexually abusing five children over a period of five years after a trial concluded in Marion County on Monday.

Iran Eli Glover, 42, was found guilty on all 143 counts against him after a jury deliberated for three hours. He is now convicted of 48 counts of first degree sexual assault, 25 counts of first degree sexual abuse and 72 counts of sexual abuse by a parent, guardian, custodian or person of trust.

The jury must be unanimous on each count in order to convict.

Glover showed no expression as the verdict was read, but asked Judge Patrick Wilson if he could read a statement once the jury was excused. Judge Wilson advised him to consult with his stand-by attorney, Scott Shough, since Glover was representing himself. After consultation, Glover chose not to make a statement. As Glover was escorted out of the courtroom though, he spoke to his family saying “This is not over, it’s far from over”. Glover can appeal his conviction following his sentencing.

Before the verdict was read, the state and defense read their closing arguments.

The state started, led by Marion County Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Dennis Kittle. He opened with the same quote from his opening statement, “It hurt. I’m scared” followed by “You now know who said that”.

Kittle said “This is a case about trust and the violation of that trust”. He then addressed Glover’s claims that the victims had fabricated stories of their abuse, because their family members were in an argument with Glover and the children overheard them saying “Glover is a bad person”. Kittle told jurors there was no reason for the victims to lie and said “What’s in it for the children? You saw their demeanor. They were terrified. They had no incentive to lie. They had to endure an uncomfortable physical exam, tell their stories to complete strangers, testify to 12 people, then be cross-examined by their assailant”.

Kittle also reminded jurors that Glover had previously “loosely admitted to the crimes so he could give up the rights to his children”, under what Glover said was the advisement of his former attorney.

Toward the end of Kittle’s closing argument, he became emotional, fighting back tears as he recalled what happened to the victims and how they were forced to recall the details of their abuse.

Kittle spoke to jurors about how Glover said “anything is possible” when asked if he could have abused the children during his initial interview with Detective Brian Stewart of the Fairmont Police Department. Kittle then said ironically “Things get confusing. It’s hard to know whether you’re tickling or assaulting a child,” speaking about Glover’s confusion during his interview about whether he had inappropriately touched the children while tickling them.

Glover then presented his closing argument to the jury, focusing on how witnesses did not testify to the fact that they saw or suspected any abuse of the children. He also repeated that there was “no medical evidence to support these children. To think that no physical evidence would be there of me and a small child having sexual intercourse is simply not believable.” A nurse previously testified in the trial that about four percent of sexual assault and abuse cases show physical evidence of that incident and it is normal to have a clear physical exam following a sexual assault or sexual abuse.

Speaking about the abuse, Glover told jurors “the children couldn’t remember details or answer questions because it never happened”.

Glover also spoke about how several of the victims were diagnosed with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and said “that could be from anything that happened in their life”.

In response to Kittle’s argument about Glover saying “anything is possible” during his initial interview, Glover told jurors “even if I said it was possible, I never said I did it”.

Glover closed by saying “No matter what, people automatically believe you’re guilty. I’ve been living under a cloud of shame for a year and a half. I never got to know my daughter who was five months old when I was taken from her and I haven’t seen my other daughter in a year and a half”.

In the state’s rebuttal, Kittle spoke of Glover’s admission to being sexually abused and assaulted as a child. Kittle told jurors “there’s a lot of similarities between the abuse the defendant had and what the victims say happened to them”.

Kittle also clarified to jurors that the victims did in fact answer questions about their abuse, and showed the anatomical diagrams they used to testify, which showed where they had been inappropriately touched and how many times.

Kittle closed by referencing Glover’s opening statement in which he said “it’s their word against mine” to which Kittle replied “I think it’s the defendant’s word against his own”.

Glover will be sentenced at a later date.

First degree sexual abuse of a person who is younger than 12 years old carries a sentence of imprisonment for not less than five nor more than 25 years and fined not less than one thousand dollars no more than five thousand dollars.

First degree sexual assault of a person who is younger than 12 years old and not married to that person carries a sentence of imprisonment for not less than 25 nor more than 100 years and fined not less than five thousand dollars no more than 25 thousand dollars.

Sexual abuse by a parent, guardian, custodian or person of trust carries a sentence of imprisonment for not less than 10 nor more than 20 years and fined not less than $500 dollars no more than five thousand dollars.

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