DEP members to discuss water crisis aftermath - WBOY - Clarksburg, Morgantown: News, Sports, Weather

DEP members to discuss water crisis aftermath

Posted: Updated:
  • BusinessBusinessMore>>

  • Autism training to expand from Huntington to Athens, WV

    Autism training to expand from Huntington to Athens, WV

    Wednesday, November 16 2016 9:45 AM EST2016-11-16 14:45:47 GMT

    The West Virginia Autism Training Center is expanding its reach in the state. WV ATC, located at Marshall University in Huntington, has partnered with Concord University to develop on-campus support in Athens for students who are diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder.

    The West Virginia Autism Training Center is expanding its reach in the state. WV ATC, located at Marshall University in Huntington, has partnered with Concord University to develop on-campus support in Athens for students who are diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder.

  • AT&T offering computer science grants

    AT&T offering computer science grants

    Monday, November 14 2016 5:08 PM EST2016-11-14 22:08:54 GMT

    Executives with ATTInternetService are offering computer sciences grants to university professors and secondary school teachers to upgrade technology in their classrooms.

    Executives with ATTInternetService are offering computer sciences grants to university professors and secondary school teachers to upgrade technology in their classrooms.

  • WV child advocacy, domestic violence groups get help from Verizon

    WV child advocacy, domestic violence groups get help from Verizon

    Thursday, October 27 2016 5:01 PM EDT2016-10-27 21:01:17 GMT

    The West Virginia Child Advocacy Network and West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence are getting help from Verizon's HopeLine program to help those affected by domestic violence and child abuse.

    The West Virginia Child Advocacy Network and West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence are getting help from Verizon's HopeLine program to help those affected by domestic violence and child abuse.

The West Virginia Chamber of Commerce's 78th Annual Meeting and Business Summit will host many speakers and address a variety of topics over the three-day affair, but one session will be covering a particularly hot topic for many West Virginia residents: the Jan. 9 Elk River chemical spill.

Following the opening session at the Summit Wednesday, Aug. 27, three concurrent sessions — CourtWatch, Energy and the Environment and Education: Advanced Career Placement — will be held at 1:30 p.m.

The Energy and the Environment session will feature a discussion among West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection members Randy Huffman, Kristin Boggs and Scott Mandirola, who will be addressing issues surrounding the Jan. 9 Freedom Industries chemical spill, in addition to Frank J. Macchiarola, executive vice president of ANGA, and David Peebles, vice president of Ascent.

“We're going to be talking about the chemical spill, the tank rule and the regulations,” said Huffman, DEP cabinet secretary.

Boggs will be addressing Senate Bill 373, also known as the “tank bill,” which was proposed just days after the chemical spill and approved by Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin in April, and Mandirola will talk about the development of the tank inspection rule that went into effect as a result of the legislation, Huffman said.

Huffman, however, said he will be focusing more on “lessons learned” after the spill.

“We were fortunate that we didn't lose water pressure,” Huffman said. “Had we lost water for sanitation, we would have been in a desperate situation in the Kanawha Valley.

“The biggest (lesson learned) is how we take clean water for granted and how fragile any society is when its drinking water supply is threatened,” he added, “but we learned that lesson without there being some of the more devastating consequences that could have happened had we lost water completely.”

Huffman also addressed the issue of the state leadership taking “a lot of criticism” during that time, which commonly spurred from passing along misinformation that they were given.

“We were passing along information as quickly as we could, and there were a few times we were passing along information that was incorrect,” Huffman said. “We passed along what we were led to believe.”

But he added that when the information they were given changed several times, it hurt their credibility.

“It's important to maybe take a little longer and make sure you're right,” he said. “When things are sensitive and you pass on information you have to change later, it goes on to an issue of trust.

“We learned a lot.”

 

Powered by Frankly