Adopted West Virginian producing 55 documentaries - WBOY - Clarksburg, Morgantown: News, Sports, Weather

Adopted West Virginian producing 55 documentaries

Posted: Updated:
  • BusinessBusinessMore>>

  • Autism training to expand from Huntington to Athens, WV

    Autism training to expand from Huntington to Athens, WV

    Wednesday, November 16 2016 9:45 AM EST2016-11-16 14:45:47 GMT

    The West Virginia Autism Training Center is expanding its reach in the state. WV ATC, located at Marshall University in Huntington, has partnered with Concord University to develop on-campus support in Athens for students who are diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder.

    The West Virginia Autism Training Center is expanding its reach in the state. WV ATC, located at Marshall University in Huntington, has partnered with Concord University to develop on-campus support in Athens for students who are diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder.

  • AT&T offering computer science grants

    AT&T offering computer science grants

    Monday, November 14 2016 5:08 PM EST2016-11-14 22:08:54 GMT

    Executives with ATTInternetService are offering computer sciences grants to university professors and secondary school teachers to upgrade technology in their classrooms.

    Executives with ATTInternetService are offering computer sciences grants to university professors and secondary school teachers to upgrade technology in their classrooms.

  • WV child advocacy, domestic violence groups get help from Verizon

    WV child advocacy, domestic violence groups get help from Verizon

    Thursday, October 27 2016 5:01 PM EDT2016-10-27 21:01:17 GMT

    The West Virginia Child Advocacy Network and West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence are getting help from Verizon's HopeLine program to help those affected by domestic violence and child abuse.

    The West Virginia Child Advocacy Network and West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence are getting help from Verizon's HopeLine program to help those affected by domestic violence and child abuse.

Wayne Worth entered the world of documentaries by committing to produce 55 of them.

A social worker by day, Worth is now two years and 39 counties into his goal of creating an educational video about the culture and history of each county in West Virginia.

Segments of “Journey into the Wild and Wonderful” can be viewed on Facebook and a corresponding website. He said every eighth grade student enrolled in a West Virginia history course should be able to learn more about their home county by 2015.

“You don’t know where you’re headed unless you know where you’ve been,” he said. Like the song made popular by Johnny Cash, Worth can say without exaggeration “I’ve Been Everywhere” across the Mountain State’s landscape from Weirton to Welch.

Now 35, he was adopted into the Mountain State as an 11-year-old from a broken home in New England. His teen years were spent in the Pocahontas County community of Minnehaha Springs. He attended Marshall University and called Huntington home for more than a decade.

Relocating to Clarksburg three years ago, he is employed by the We Care Home Care agency. Worth, who is engaged, devotes much of his leisure time to Fairmont where he helps organize the First Friday Music Series and serves on the board of the local Main Street program. He returns to Huntington each June 20, though, to continue his tradition of displaying a large West Virginia Day birthday card along a downtown street.

Worth ventured twice to each county across the state before being coerced into the series of documentaries. History books provided him with background information prior to the weekend trips armed with a small video camera.

“I wanted to learn more about the state that adopted me, challenged me and led me to success,” said Worth, a History Hero award recipient from the West Virginia Division of Culture and History. “I want to contribute to the state where I plan to be the rest of my life.”

His “journey” began in Wyoming County during the spring of 2012. While each 30-minute video is unique, he typically speaks with representatives from the local historical society or convention and visitors bureau.

“West Virginians identify with their home counties,” said Worth. “Each county pretty much has its own culture, own politics, own history and own expectations. I’m talking with people who take pride in their heritage. These are people who are very connected with local history. A couple of folks even got emotional.”

Along the way he has recorded historians such as West Liberty University professor David Javersak, an expert on West Virginia’s statehood movement, and attorney Larry Rowe, whose office occupies an historic structure in the Kanawha County town of Malden.

Other subjects have included Calhoun County’s Bob Weaver, who edits an internet publication known as “The Hur Herald.”

“Here I am in a small community in the middle of nowhere talking with the editor of an online newspaper,” said Worth. “Amazing.”

Worth said he is making the documentaries as “West Virginia” as possible. Introductory music is performed by his brother-in-law, Jake Krack, a nationally recognized fiddle player.

“In my travels, I learned that what defines our values, culture and what is important to us, is our history,” he said. “It’s about where we came from and where we’re going. That’s what this project is all about.”

 

Powered by Frankly